Books

Since the fateful first April day in 1914 a number of accounts of the ‘Burston Rebellion’ and its legacy has been written. The following are available from the museum:

£4.10 for the Farmworkers

£4.10 for the Farmworker By Tom Potter

Recently rediscovered, Tom Potter’s pamphlet, with forward by A.C.Dann (then General Secretary of the N.U.A.W) and published by the Country Standard, was written soon after the end of WW2. It charts the case, and the farmworkers’ fight to win £4.10 ward from the Wages Board.

Bodies without Abodes

Bodies without Abodes by Tom Higdon.

Little is known about this pamphlet’s original production but according to the British Library it was produced by the Labour Leader Press in 1912.  Written in narrative form, in Tom’s native Somerset dialect, it is a bitter tale on the theme of poor housing and tied accommodation.

The Burston Rebllion by T.G Higdon

The Burston Rebllion by T.G Higdon

Originally published by The National Labour Press, Tom Higdon recalls the events that lead too, and the legacy of ‘The Burston Rebellion’. Violet Potter, then aged 16, completely re-drafted the author’s manuscript prior to its 1916 publication. Reprinted for the 2014 centennial celebrations.

The Burston School Strike By ‘Casey’

The Burston School Strike By ‘Casey’

Walter Hampson a.k.a ‘Casey’ a journalist (and fiddle player) of The Labour Leader wrote his pamphlet in support of the Higdon‘s cause. Published in 1915 he writes: ‘This little booklet is dedicated to the BRAVE WOMEN OF BURSTON, who have since April, 1914, nobly struggled against the tyranny of the  Countryside’.

The Burston School Strike by The Trustees

The Burston School Strike by The Trustees

First published in 1989 by the trustees of the Strike School this readable book was remained in print ever since as a highly accessible introduction to the events that lead to the action of 1914 that spawned ‘The Longest Strike in History’.

The School of Freedom by Anne May Potter

The School of Freedom by Anne. M. May (nee Potter)

Written, compiled and edited by the niece of Violet Potter, Anne May has produced an account of how the Higdons and the Burston Strike has influenced the lives of her and her extended family.

A Striking Village -Memories of Burston by Anne. M. May (nee Potter)

A Striking Village -Memories of Burston by Anne. M. May (nee Potter)

With a subtitle of ‘The School Strike, Burston, Norfolk (1914-1939) & its Legacy – A Centennual Review of a Unique Inheritance’, Anne May has written the most comprehensive, yet focussed account of the first 100 years since the start of the ‘Burston Rebellion’.

Other books are unfortunately been out of print for some time, but can be obtained via second hand bookshops and online retailers:

The Burston School Strike by Bert Edwards

The Burston School Strike by Bert Edwards

Unfortunately out of print since the mid 1970’s Bert Edwards book is a highly researched book, based on original reports and documents, and on interviews with (then) surviving participants. Includes a detail section on the Higdon’s ‘Wood Dalling’ years.

Burton Rebllion by Beta Zamoska

The Burston Rebellion by Beta Zamoyska

The 1980’s saw a highly acclaimed BBC television film, starring Eileen Atkins, Bernard Hill and John Shrapnel. Written as a supporting account, Zamoyska based her version upon the villagers’ own memories, and on eyewitness stories and newspaper reports.

The School that Went on Strike by Pamela Scobie

The School that Went on Strike by Pamela Scobie

Based on the real events, this is a narrative version of the group of children who came together to fight for justice after the Head Mistress and Assistant Master of their school were sacked. It follows the events of their school strike and their eventual triumph over the authorities.

Burston School Strike (Oxford Playscripts)

Burston School Strike (Oxford Playscripts)

A well constructed play written by Roy Nevitt, and designed as a school production. The events of Burston come alive as a great piece of documentary drama, with helpful resources as well as the script itself.